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After a Year Unlike Any Other, What Community Banks and Credit Unions Should Budget for in 2021

After a Year Unlike Any Other, What Community Banks and Credit Unions Should Budget for in 2021

In 2020 we’ve learned a lot about ourselves, and whether the general population realizes it or not, they have learned a lot about something often relegated just to banking: Risk Tolerance. And with that in mind, here are seven key items that your institution should consider while budgeting for 2021:

1. Laptops

Supply is down, demand is up, so from a pricing standpoint, you are unlikely to find great deals on laptops, but their portability has been a key component to companies and employees being successful during the pandemic. Remote work is a great option for employees who do not need face-to-face interactions with customers or members, but not every department can work successfully outside of the main office or branch.

When planning for next year, each position in the institution needs to be evaluated, if it hasn’t already, to determine the ability and effectiveness of remote working. When possible, consider having remote employees use a company laptop going forward. In a recent Safe Systems survey of community financial institutions, 1/3 of respondents have already decided that they will be purchasing more laptops this year.

2. Hardware Management Software

How many of the controls you use to secure your institution’s devices require the device to physically be in the office? As the work environment changes and more people make the shift to working from home offices, your current controls need to be evaluated to ensure they work just as effectively outside of the branch. For years, the push for “agentless” controls has been popular, but many of these controls assumed the office was a well-defined building where all devices used the financial institution’s network. As the home office becomes the new standard for many banks and credit unions, the need for agent-based controls is greater than ever. Controls/security measures are no longer effective if they require the device to be on premise.

3. Business Continuity Plan (BCP) Update

Having an updated pandemic plan as part of your BCP is still likely a need for many institutions. Because it has been more than a century since a full-scale pandemic hit the U.S., many of the assumptions and concepts that pandemic plans were based on have proven to be incorrect. For instance, many plans outlined operational changes based on only 50% staff for just a week or two. Much of the concern before 2020 was making sure staff members were properly cross trained in the event key individuals were unavailable for days or perhaps a few weeks. While this is still very important, it represents only a tiny portion of truly being ready for a pandemic.

Pandemic plans often did not address managing operations for a long duration or important measures like social distancing, security measures, consumer access, etc. Financial institutions must take a hard look at key lessons learned so far during the COVID-19 pandemic and update their plans accordingly.

4. Moving to the Cloud

Recognizing that having employees working outside of the office is a real possibility moving forward, investing in new servers and putting them in offices is becoming an antiquated idea. The cloud provides a level of redundancy, scalability, and accessibility that cannot be matched by buying a single server. It also means no one has to be in the office to manage the infrastructure. As servers need to be replaced, banks and credit unions should seriously consider the process of moving to the cloud.

5. Client Experience

One question every institution should be asking itself is: “how can we better enhance the customer experience?” While IT is usually seen as a cost center, the events of the past year may have opened a door for IT to step up and offer solutions that directly affect the customer experience. The pandemic has forced many people, some maybe for the first time, to adopt digital banking solutions. If IT can offer specific tools and/or insight into how to improve the customer experience, this may be the opening that IT has hoped for to secure a “seat at the table” among their institution’s leadership.

6. Cybersecurity

Garmin, the GPS and active wear company, reportedly paid $10 million in 2020 to counter a ransomware attack. Their customers were without the services for over a week while Garmin’s data was held hostage. All of the information about their case is not available yet, but the sad reality is that they likely could have prevented the entire situation with just a few technology solutions and security settings being implemented correctly. The threat to your data is as real today as it ever has been. Be sure to have a conversation with a security company you trust to ensure that even if you are the target of a ransomware attack, it won’t be able to hurt your business long-term. Invest in cybersecurity now, so that your institution won’t end up paying much more later.

Consider this: Cyber-attacks are 300 times more likely to hit financial services firms than other companies, according to a recent Boston Consulting Group report, and cyber-attacks continue to climb each year, with the global cybersecurity market expected to eclipse $300 billion by 2024, according to Global Insights.

Unfortunately spend and layers of protection most likely need to increase annually to address this issue.

  • Employee training – to ensure adequate and effective
  • Perimeter protection – to ensure the appropriate layers are enabled and all traffic is being handled correctly including encrypted traffic
  • Advance threat protection and logging – to be able to identify how, if at all, malware or an intrusion created an incident
  • Backup and data redundancy – to ensure ransomware can’t wipe out your data

Per Computer Services, Inc (CSI), 59% of financial institutions will increase spending for cybersecurity this year.

7. ISO

With the increase in responsibilities of the Information Security Officer and the focus on separation/segregation of duties, there has been an uptick in the number of institutions looking for virtual ISO (VISO)-type solutions. These solutions can help by taking some level of burden off of internal resources, provide staff with templates or toolsets when needed, and oversight to ensure nothing is falling through the cracks.

For 2021, there are a lot of things to consider. One focus should be to look at the changes your institution had to make because of the pandemic and what changes you should consider making in the future to improve cybersecurity, information security, and as always, your customers’ and members’ experience.