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Planning for Safety, Soundness, and Resiliency

Planning for Safety, Soundness, and Resiliency

With the rise in cybercrimes and increased regulatory scrutiny, having a board-approved IT Strategic Plan is often not enough to ensure cyber resiliency. It’s essential for financial institutions to develop a robust IT management and information security infrastructure. The following excerpts from our recent white paper on “Building IT and Information Security Resiliency in Chaotic Times,” show how institutions can strengthen and support these key management roles to make better technology and security decisions, improve visibility, and reduce vulnerability. In addition, institutions can use strategic partners and risk management solutions to bolster resources they already have in place and enhance their overall cyber resilience.

1. Separating ISO Duties

Examiners have a strong interest in the IT administrator and ISO roles, which are interconnected and integral to an institution’s safety and soundness. However, many community banks and credit units still struggle with meeting the FFIEC requirements for segregating these positions. The importance of separating ISO duties relates to creating additional oversight to verify activities and maintain accountability to management and the board. Separating these functions also helps to build a clear audit trail to ensure risk is being accurately assessed and reported to senior management. While the ISO functions in an oversight capacity of the IT administrator, the ISO also relies heavily on the administrator to share data that can be used to recommend steps to improve the institution’s security posture. Therefore, the IT admin-ISO relationship must also be cooperative to ensure their daily activities support the organization’s policies and procedures.

2. Being Proactive about Succession Planning

Regulators expect financial institutions to have a formal succession plan for the ISO, IT administrator, and other key leadership roles, as indicated by the uptick in exam findings related to this issue. Depending on their size, type, and goals, institutions may employ different approaches for succession planning. They can identify and train someone to serve as an alternate or “backup” for various IT or ISO responsibilities, incorporate an internal committee or team approach for managing IT and information security, or use the support of a trusted third party to maintain IT and information security standards.

3. Partnering with a Trusted Third Party

An outside expert can provide an objective perspective that can help institutions think beyond the day-to-day issues and consider risk more proactively and strategically. Bringing in a technology partner on the front end—when things are going well—can also position institutions to be stronger and more successful in the future. For instance, a virtual information security officer (VISO) can expand an internal ISO’s capabilities and increase the likelihood that all ISO-related tasks are completed in a timely and efficient manner. A VISO can also provide an external layer of oversight to enable the required separation of duties.

ISOversight®, our virtual ISO service, makes it easier for financial institutions to master information security and manage compliance online. ISOversight is a comprehensive solution with a full suite of applications and resources, cyber risk reporting, and dedicated compliance specialists. It’s uniquely designed to help banking institutions enhance their strategies to improve IT management, information security, and compliance. With ISOversight, community banks and credit unions can ensure that no information security issues fall through the cracks—especially during challenging times.

For more information about how to enhance your institution’s security posture, read the full white paper on “Building IT and Information Security Resiliency in Chaotic Times.”