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What to Budget for in 2023

What to Budget for in 2023

Marty McFly (the lead character in “Back to the Future”) could not have predicted the world we live in today. Though the movie’s portrayal of flying cars, floating hoverboards, and shoes that lace themselves may have been a little far-fetched, we now have IoT, the Internet of Things. This powerful networking capability connects everything in our lives to a single electronic device that can be held in the palm of our hands. I can open my garage door, adjust the temperature of my house, set my alarm system, and even check the status of the clothes in my dryer—all from my mobile phone. Predictions are always a synthesis of art, science—and uncertainty. None of us truly knows what tomorrow will bring. We just know it will look a little different than it did today. With that in mind, it’s almost budgeting season, so here are my predictions for the top areas your bank or credit union should consider budgeting for in 2023:

1. Compliance Services

Compliance continues to be a strong focus for many community financial institutions. It’s important to be able to evaluate all your policies and programs to see where you may need assistance before your next exam. If you aren’t sure if your policies and programs are keeping up with regulations, you may want to hire a third party to provide an objective perspective. Companies like Safe Systems will often conduct a review as a courtesy or for a nominal fee.

You should also consider investing in these two popular compliance services that have gained traction in recent years:

  • Virtual ISO: There are several service models available, so make sure you find the one that matches your institution’s needs. (Check out our recent webinar that walks you through the pros and cons of three virtual ISO models.) For instance, Safe Systems’ ISOversight service includes a dedicated compliance specialist, along with a suite of online compliance applications to help you develop and manage your vendors, business continuity plan, Cybersecurity Assessment Tool, and information security program.
  • Vendor Management: Your assessment of a vendor should define what controls are needed to effectively mitigate risks posed by each vendor. Some critical or high-risk vendors may require reviewing documents like contracts, financials, or SOC 2 audit reports. Evaluating these documents can feel daunting because it can be time-consuming and understanding each type of document can require a different skill set. Many institutions are offloading the document review process to third-party companies to help them identify the key information in each document and better manage risk.

2. Supply Chain Issues

The supply chain issues that started during the middle of the pandemic have continued through 2022. Servers, switches, firewalls, and other hardware devices are still in limited supply. For 2023, continue to plan and order hardware well in advance of your needs. If you wait until you need it, you may encounter delays. Six months is the current lead time for certain devices. Also, when replacing a workstation in 2023, evaluate whether a laptop or desktop computer would be the best replacement. While laptops introduce some new risks due to their mobility, they also allow flexibility for users. If a laptop will enable an employee to work remotely during a disaster or pandemic, it may be more beneficial to switch to this laptop to optimize your hardware investment.

3. Cloud Security

Cloud security should continue to be top of mind. Although the Cloud offers plenty of advantages, it comes with numerous control settings, management tools, and security options that must be effectively configured and maintained to ensure the highest level of protection. This should be a key area of concern for not only institutions with infrastructure in the Cloud, but also those with M365 licenses—which include Exchange Online, SharePoint, OneDrive—or those using Microsoft Azure Active Directory as an authentication platform through a third-party provider. Too often institutions only think about hosting servers in the Cloud when it comes to cloud security. While moving infrastructure to the Cloud is a current trend, almost all institutions store some information there. Safe Systems has worked with several institutions with assets ranging from $100 million to multi-billion dollars and found that almost all of them had gaps in their cloud security when it comes to their cloud tenants. Some institutions had their email or user accounts compromised while others had the wrong M365 security settings in place, which left the door open to future compromises. Safe Systems’ CloudInsight suite of products includes M365 Security and Utility Basics solutions to detect common risks and help institutions better manage the increasing array of M365 security settings and controls. These reasonably priced options deliver a substantial amount of value, so contact us for a quote to determine if our CloudInsight solution will fit into your budget next year.

4. Cybersecurity

Cybersecurity must stay top of mind for both your institution and its employees. If you do not have a solution to train and test your staff on information security best practices, consider investing in one next year. These are typically not expensive solutions, and they provide exceptional value—as well as critical protection. It is estimated that cyberattacks are 300 times more likely to be targeted against financial services firms than other companies. If that isn’t enough to keep you up at night, then consider that Cybersecurity Ventures expects global cybercrime costs to reach $10.5 trillion annually by 2025—and will be more profitable than the global trade of all major illegal drugs combined. Remember, where the money is, the crooks will follow. Every year you must evaluate your current security layers and decide if they are still effective and if you have enough of them in place.

“If it were measured as a country, then cybercrime—which is thought to have inflicted damages totaling $6 trillion USD globally in 2021—would be the world’s third-largest economy after the U.S. and China.”

Preparing for next year requires you to first evaluate where you are this year. You could decide to simply “rinse and repeat” what you did this year, but that would be a missed opportunity to really understand what is working, what isn’t, and what can be improved. Also, consider your institution’s short- and long-term plans. Sometimes what makes sense today doesn’t make sense when compared to your future plans for growth, increased redundancy, and more. While you can’t predict the future, you can at least ensure your 2023 budget reflects your best guess for where your institution is headed.